Doug Short's picture

Yesterday Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer gave a speech entitled The Great Recession: Moving Ahead. A key topic is the question of long-term structural changes to the economy — whether we're experiencing economic weakness with deeper roots than the cyclical effect of the last recession.

John Butler's picture

The Death of Money, Jim Rickards’ second book, has met with widespread acclaim. In it, Jim refines and develops multiple topics raised in his first book, Currency Wars, as well as adding some intriguing new material regarding the role of intelligence agencies in international financial and monetary affairs.

Tom McClellan's picture

By now most who follow the stock market know that the first two years of each presidential term are basically flat, but the good times come in the 3rd year which is nearly always an up year.

Chris Puplava's picture

One of the reasons why we have secular cycles is due to the time-tested principle that people don’t change. The two greatest emotions that every investor has battled with are fear and greed. We see euphoria and rampant greed at secular bull market tops and outright despair and fear at...

Marc Chandler's picture

Walgreen's decision to go ahead and buy the 55% of Alliance-Boots that it does not own, but not move their headquarters may mark the beginning of the end of the so-called inversion boom. Inversion is simply when a U.S. business buys a foreign company in a lower tax country and moves its headquarters there.

Chris Puplava's picture

Based on capitulation-like selling in both the small cap equity and junk bond segments of the market, it is quite likely that last Friday marked a low. While the recent pullback was not fun it also wasn’t the beginning of a bear market as many bearish pundits claimed.

Jeffrey D Saut's picture

Is the public wrong all the time? The answer is decidedly, “No.” The public is perhaps right more of the time than not. In stock-market parlance, the public is right during the trends but wrong at both ends!

Tom McClellan's picture

If you want to get worried about long-term stock market valuations, this week's chart should do the job. I saw a version of this chart recently in a research report by Daniel J. Want, who is Analytics Director for Prerequisite Capital Management in Queensland, Australia.

John Butler's picture

Although it might seem odd for a school of economics to largely ignore the role of money in the economy, this is indeed the case with traditional Keynesian economics. Declaring in 1963 that, “Inflation is, always and everywhere, a monetary phenomenon,”

Chris Puplava's picture

Given the persisent deterioration in market breadth starting around the beginning of July, I began cautioning over the last couple weeks that risks for a correction were starting to build. Now that the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average have finally cracked, the question is how much more damage is to come?

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