John Butler's picture

Although it might seem odd for a school of economics to largely ignore the role of money in the economy, this is indeed the case with traditional Keynesian economics. Declaring in 1963 that, “Inflation is, always and everywhere, a monetary phenomenon,”

Chris Puplava's picture

Given the persisent deterioration in market breadth starting around the beginning of July, I began cautioning over the last couple weeks that risks for a correction were starting to build. Now that the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average have finally cracked, the question is how much more damage is to come?

Bill Fleckenstein's picture

Stock market action finally became interesting for a change today, both on and beneath the surface. First of all, the SPOOs [S&P 500 index futures] were weak overnight, for no particular reason, though the mainstream media tried to make up several excuses ranging from Argentina's default...

Robert Rapier's picture

In the U.S., coal consumption has been flat to declining for the past 20 years. Just since 2007, U.S. coal consumption has fallen by more than 20%. This is the primary reason the U.S. leads all countries in reducing carbon dioxide emissions over that same time period.

Doug Short's picture

The Latest Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index was released this morning based on data collected through July 17. The headline number of 90.9 was an improvement over the revised June final reading of 86.4, an upward revision from 85.2.

Axel G Merk's picture

While we are busy arguing whether the Fed’s exit will consist of rising rates, reverse repos or the trimming of its massive portfolio, the Fed may well be fooling all of us. Investors must have been swallowing lots of blue pills not to see the illusion hiding in plain sight.

Charles Hugh Smith's picture

Which appears more likely—a straight-line extension of the past two years' rise in stocks, or another "impossible" decline to complete the megaphone pattern?

Keith Weiner's picture

I don’t typically emphasize price charts in analyzing the market, however something unusual has been happening in the spot (physical) silver market. It did not happen in the silver futures market, nor in the gold market.

Ned W Schmidt CFA's picture

Markets often do talk to us, if only we would listen. Our ears serve as only part of listening. An open mind is also required. Regrettably, minds receptive to new thoughts and questions have been somewhat outmoded in the investment world for many years. Why else do so many seem to ignore what commodities are saying?

Chris Puplava's picture

There are many successful investors who have accumulated decades of experience and have drilled down their pearls of wisdom to insightful lists. One such list, or ten rules to remember, comes from legendary investor Bob Farrell who spent decades at Merrill Lynch & Co. and retired as their chief stock market analyst in 1992.

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