Rob Kirby's picture

In the wake of the recent unprecedented and highly questionable demise of Bear Stearns, I had the opportunity to speak with Catherine Austin Fitts regarding some of the fuzzier elements surrounding Bear’s demise.

Rob Kirby's picture

Last week the Federal Reserve’s FOMC [Federal Open Market Committee] met and bestowed upon us their latest decision in monetary policy – a further cut of 25 basis points to lower the Fed Funds rate to 2%.

Tim W Wood CPA's picture

Cycles are really just another way of looking at various trends of various degrees. Also, cycles in the market are really no different than many other cycles in nature. As an example, sometimes we have an early spring and sometimes it’s late. Sometimes a particular bird’s migration is earlier than normal and sometimes it can be a bit later than normal.

Chris Puplava's picture

The advanced estimate from the Bureau of Economic Analysis showed Q1 real GDP coming in at a 0.60% annualized rate, slightly higher than the 0.58% annualized rate seen in Q4 2007.

Chris Puplava's picture

Not only did oil break $100/barrel despite widespread disbelief, it is now knocking on the door of $120/barrel. The strength in oil prices is even taking the most ardent energy bulls by surprise despite a U.S. slowdown.

Rob Kirby's picture

Last week saw China renew a contract with Potash Corp. of Toronto which calls for shipment of 1 million metric tons of potash at $576 per metric ton, which appears to be a $400 per metric ton increase over the 2007 price.

Tim W Wood CPA's picture

Obviously, the definitions of Bull and Bear markets differ from person to person. My definition is based on the works of the great Dow theorists, Charles H. Dow, William Peter Hamilton and Robert Rhea. As a result of my study of Dow Theory combined with my study of cycles, which are not a part of Dow theory, I have drawn some very obvious conclusions about the nature of Bull and Bear markets.

Chris Puplava's picture

By Chris Puplava – Last week's Observation provoked a lot of responses from both the commodity bulls and bears. I had hoped to get ahead of the likely bear comments by addressing several of the arguments that they would likely claim but ran...

Chris Puplava's picture

Enough is enough! As most commodities rallied strongly in February and into early March, many in the financial press were calling commodities a "bubble." What happened to the commodity bubble of 2005, 2006, 2007?

Rob Kirby's picture

We all read and hear from officialdom that the prospects for inflation, while elevated somewhat recently, always remain anchored and/or subdued on a forward looking basis.

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